Work

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In thermodynamics, work (TR:1226) (LH:55) (TL:1281|#15) symbol W or Delta W.png, from the Greek erga (NE:109), is the result of a change that occurs whenever a "force" moves a body (or object) through a unit of "distance" of space or (or spacetime), quantifiable in in units of energy, as defined by the mechanical equivalent of heat.[1]

Overview

The formulation of "work" as the product of "force" times "distance" was first officially introduced by Gustave Coriolis, in 1829 "principle of the transmission of work", as follows:[2]

where W is work, F is force, and d is distance through which the body is moved by the force.

Quotes

The following are quotes by Goethe:

“My work is an assemblage of ‘essences’, which have been derived from the course of nature. This bears the name of ‘Goethe’.”
Johann Goethe (c.1820), Publication; cited by Newell Sims in Society and Surplus (pg. 342); compare: James Maxwell (1879), Wilhelm Ostwald (1926), and Carl Sagan (1980)
“Every force tends to give motion to the body on which it acts; but it may be prevented from doing so by other opposing forces, so that equilibrium results, and the body remains at rest. In this case the force performs no work. But as soon as the body moves under the influence of the force, work is performed.”
Rudolf Clausius (1875), “Mathematical Introduction” (pg. 1) [3]

End matter

See also

  • Ergon
  • Ergonal
  • Work transmission principle

References

  1. (b) Clausius, Rudolf. (1865). The Mechanical Theory of Heat Thomas Hirst) (Ѻ). Macmillan & Co, 1867.
    (c) Clausius, Rudolf. (1875). The Mechanical Theory of Heat (translator: Walter Browne). Macmillan & Co, 1679.
  2. Principle of the transmission of work (subdomain) - Hmolpedia 2020.
  3. (a) Clausius, Rudolf. (1858). “On the Treatment of Differential Equations which are not Directly Integrable”, Dingler’s Polytechnisches Journal, 150:29.
    (b) Clausius, Rudolf. (1865). The Mechanical Theory of Heat (§: On the Treatment of Differential Equations which are not Directly Integrable, pgs. 1-13) Thomas Hirst) (Ѻ). Macmillan & Co, 1867.
    (c) Clausius, Rudolf. (1875). The Mechanical Theory of Heat (§:Mathematical Introduction: on Mechanical Work, on Energy, and on the Treatment of Non-Integrable Differential Equations, pgs. 1-20) (translator: Walter Browne). Macmillan & Co, 1679.
    (d) Mathematical Introduction (subdomain) – Hmolpedia 2020.

External links

  • Work – Hmolpedia 2020.
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