Vis of Venus

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The origin of the "vis of Venus" model of "life" (vita), defined by Marcus Varro (50BC) and Lucilius (120BC), according to which those born of "vis" (force) of the goddess Venus, had the property of "vita", or life, or were defined as being alive. The model itself, is a rescript of the "Is of Aphrodite" model (700BC) of the Greeks, shown center, which was a rescript of the "ankh of Hathor" model of the Egyptians, shown above left.

In terms, vis of Venus (LH:10), from the "Is of Aphrodite" (Greece, 700BC), is the Roman model (Lucilius, 120BC) of "life", according to which Venus was defined as the "goddess of vis" (Hinds, 2006), "vis" was defined as a "divine force", and those were were born with this vis or divine force were defined as having "vita" or life (Varro, c.50BC), i.e. being alive. This is the base etymology of the modern English word "life".

Overview

In 120BC, Lucilius wrote the following:

Life is force you see: to do everything force doth compel us.” [English]
Vis est vita vides? Vis nos facere omnia cogit.” [Latin]
— Lucilius (120BC), Publications (pg. #)

In 50BC, Marcus Varro, in his On the Latin Language, cited the above quote by Lucilius, to argue the following:

“The poets, in that they say that the very seed fell from the sky into the sea and Venus was born ‘from the foam masses’, through the conjunction of fire and moisture, are indicating that the vis or ‘force’ which they have is that of Venus [Aphrodite]. Those born of vis have what is called vita, ‘life’, and that is what is meant by Lucilius (c.120BC) when he says: ‘life is force you see: to do everything force doth compel us’.”
Marcus Varro (c.50BC), On the Latin Language: On the Science and Origin of Words, Addressed to Cicero, Volume One (pg. 61) [1]

In 2014, Jay Fisher, in his The Annals of Quintus Ennius and the Italian Tradition, comments on the Varro argument about the "vis of Venus" model of life, as follows:

“According to at least one Roman writer, ‘vis’ and ‘vita’ may be both elements of a traditional collocation and derivations of the same root. Varro’s claim that the vita [life] is given to children by the vis of Venus may be an implicit etymology.”
— Jay Fisher (2014), The Annals of Quintus Ennius and the Italian Tradition (pg. 152) [2]

In sum, according to Lucilius, Varro, and Fisher, the "Roman theory of life", which they adopted from the "Greek theory of life", aka Aphrodite model, which is adopted from the "Egyptian theory of life", aka Hathor model, is that life is the result of what the force compels us to do.

American model

The following is the upgrade, aka the "American model" (Thims, 65AE):[3]

American model.png

wherein, the "vis of Venus" definition of "life" (or alive), has been upgraded to the electromagnetic force model of human origins, reactions, form change, animation, and future movements.

Quotes

The following are related quotes:

“It has been suggested by J.M. Snyder, indeed, in a 1980 book written against the background of Friedlander’s seminal article on Lucretian word-play, that the whole opening section of De Rerum Natura can be read as an exploration of Venus as the one who venit ad omnia. However, at least one other etymological approach to Venus seems to be discernible elsewhere in the Lucretian proem – so we might perhaps better envisage the Lucretian opening as an exploration of different etymological aspects of the goddess (an incipient etymological aretalogy, if you like). Venus who venit ad omnia; but also Venus as goddess of vis (DRN 1.12-13).”
— Stephen Hinds (2006), “Venus, Varro, and Vates; Toward the Limits of Etymologizing Interpretation”[4]

End matter

See also

References

  1. (a) Varro, Marcus. (c.50BC). On the Latin Language: On the Science and the Origin of Words, Addressed to Cicero, Volume One (pg. 61), Volume Two (editor: G.P. Goold). Harvard University Press, 1938.
    (b) Fisher, Jay. (2014). The Annals of Quintus Ennius: and the Italic Tradition (vis est vita, pg. 152). JHT Press.
  2. Fisher, Jay. (2014). The Annals of Quintus Ennius and the Italic Tradition (vis est vita, pg. 152). JHT Press.
  3. Thims, Libb. (66AE). Abioism: No Thing is Alive, On the Non-Existence of Life (pdf). Publisher.
  4. Hinds, Stephen. (2006). “Venus, Varro, and Vates; Toward the Limits of Etymologizing Interpretation”, Dictynna, 3.
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