Virus

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In terms, virus (TR:5) (LH:11) (TL:12), from Greek βι- (NE:12), meaning: "full moon", from Latin: vi-, meaning: "full strength or power", + -ios (ιος) (NE:280) to mean "poison", is a CHNOPS species, ten times smaller than a bacteria, which carries out reproduction via host cell carrier RNA (or DNA) injection, often destroying the host in the process.

Overview

Etymology

In 800BC, Greeks used the term "ios" (ιος) (NE:280) to mean "poison", which is said to be akin to the word virus.[1] The secret name of 280 words are: "arrow" or "one". (Barry, 1999).

In 200BC, the term "virus", in Latin, was employed, supposedly, in the meaning of: "poison, sap of plants, slimy liquid, a potent juice".[2]

In 1398, John Trevisa, in his English-to-Latin translation of Bartholomeus Anglicus's De Proprietatibus Rerum, introduced the term "virus" into the English language.

Covid virus

On 16 Mar 2020, Covid-19 arrived in Chicago, during which point the entire state shut down, and Libb Thims spent the next 3+ months, at home, focused on making progress on his Human Chemical Thermodynamics manuscript

In early 2020, Covid virus, released from China, spread to the world, initiating a pandemic mode, putting the world into a stay-at-home state of existence.

Quotes

The following are quotes:

“When, in 1998 to 2004, I was at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, we would have endless discussions on the definition of life. What is life? The discussions were always hinged on the metaphysical and religiously-infused idea that there should be a ‘line’ [?] — things on one side of the line were alive and things on the other were not. The game was to "find that line". People argued and continue to argue about this endlessly. Should it ‘reproduce’, ‘reduce the entropy’ of its environment, ‘have DNA’, or what? For example, viruses are infectious, reproduce, and have DNA and most vote they are alive (but some not). Prions, which cause mad cow disease, are malevolent proteins that reproduce, are infectious, but have no DNA. Most say they are not alive and say we should draw the line of life between prions and viruses. My response to these discussions was, there is no such thing as life! There are interesting chemical reactions, like Stephen Hawking, and less interesting chemical reactions, like salt crystals growing in a glass of salt water. There is no line, no ‘breath of life’ separating living from nonliving. That is a metaphysical bit of silliness. We should focus on interesting over boring chemical reactions and forget about this line that does not exist except in our own minds.”
Jonathan Dowling (2013), Schrodinger's Killer App: Race to Build the World's First Quantum Computer (ref. #88, pgs. 429-30) [3]

End matter

See also

References

  1. Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 2000.
  2. Virus – EtymOnline.com.
  3. Dowling, Jonathan. (2013). Schrödinger's Killer App: Race to Build the World's First Quantum Computer (ref. #88, pgs. 429-30; soul, pgs. 11, 398; god, 12+ pgs). CRC Press.
  4. Crystal model of life – Hmolpedia 2020.

External links

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