Thomas Kuhn

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In existographies, Thomas Kuhn (33 BE-41 AE) (1922-1996 ACM) (IQ:#|#) (PR:1,885|65AE / historian:13) (Becker 139:131|3L) (Stokes 100:98) (Listal 100:77) (Reuters 2009:35) (HGC:276) (CR:30) (LH:2) (TL:32) was an American physicist and historian, noted for []

Overview

In 1962, Kuhn, in his The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, argued that paradigm change occurs when two or more people simultaneously and independently arrive at the same conclusion, view, or finding.[1] The archetype model he refers to is the discovery of the conservation of energy, wherein he discussed how twelve people, primarily: Robert Mayer, Hermann Helmholtz, and James Joule, all independently arrived at the same new revolutionary view, within the same handful of years.

Quotes

Quotes | By

The following are quotes by Kuhn:

“I’ve always rather liked thermodynamics; that sense of a subject which is largely mathematical but which gives you important physical consequences is a strange, tasteful experience.”
— Thomas Kuhn (c.1960), Commented undergraduate course with Philipp Frank and graduate course with Percy Bridgman [2]

End matter

References

  1. Kuhn, Thomas. (1962). The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Publisher.
  2. Kuhn, Thomas S., Conant, James, and Haugleland, John. (2002). The Road Since Structure: Philosophical Essays, 1970-1993, with an Autobiographical Interview (pgs. 267-78). University of Chicago Press.

Videos

  • Anon. (2020). “Thomas Kuhn: the Structure of Scientific Revolutions” (YT), Then & Now, May 27.

External links

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