Stokes 100

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In genius studies, Stokes 100 refers to a 2002 listing of one-hundred essential thinkers, over the last 2,600-years, according to Philip Stokes[1], a British-born Thai philosopher, in his book Philosophy 100: Essential Thinkers, grouped by thematically or via classification and ordered chronologically.[2]

Overview

The following are the names of the Stokes 100; the slated symbol "§" means the names have been slated into the candidates page, the box symbol "" indicates the names have not been added to either the slated candidates page, nor the top 2000 rankings:

Presocratics The Eleatics Academics Atomists Cynics
1. Thales

2. Pythagoras
3. Xenophanes
4. Heraclitus

5. Parmenides

6. Zeno of Elea

7. Socrates

8. Plato
9. Aristotle

10. Democritus

11. Epicurus

12. Diogenes of Sinope
Stoics Sceptics Neoplatonists Christians Scholastics
13. Cicero

14. Philo of Alexandria §
15. Seneca
16. Marcus Aurelius

17. Sextus Empiricus
18. Plotinus 19. Augustine[3]

20. Boethius

21. Anselm

22. Thomas Aquinas
23. Duns Scotus
24. William of Occam

Age of Science Rationalists Empiricists Idealists Liberals
25. Nicolaus Copernicus

26. Niccolo Machiavelli
27. Desiderius Erasmus
28. Thomas More
29. Francis Bacon
30. Galileo Galilei
31. Thomas Hobbes
32. Isaac Newton

33. Rene Descartes

34. Antonie Arnauld
35. Nicolas Malebranche
36. Benedict Spinoza
37. Gottfried Leibniz

38. John Locke

39. David Hume
40. Thomas Reid
41. Voltaire
42. Jean Rousseau
43. Denis Diderot

44. George Berkeley

45. Immanuel Kant
46. Friedrich Schiller
47. Friedrich Schelling
48. Georg Hegel
49. Arthur Schopenhauer

50. Adam Smith

51. Mary Wollstonecraft
52. Thomas Paine
53. Jeremy Bentham
54. John Mill
55. Auguste Comte

Evolutionists Materialists Existentialists Linguistic Turn Postmodernists
56. Charles Darwin

57. Henri Bergson
58. Alfred Whitehead

63. Karl Marx

64. Friedrich Engels
65. Vladimir Lenin
66. Sigmund Freud
67. Carl Jung
68. John Keynes

69. Soren Kierkegaard

70. Friedrich Nietzsche
71. Edmund Husserl
72. Martin Heidegger
73. Jean-Paul Sartre
74. Albert Camus
75. Simone de Beauvoir

76. Gottleb Frege

77. Bertrand Russell
78. Ludwig Wittgenstein
79. Ferdinand de Saussure
80. George Moore
81. Moritiz Schlick
82. Lev Vygotsky
83. Rudolph Carnap
84. A.J. Austin
85. Alfred Tarski
86. J.L. Austin
87. Gilbert Ryle

89. Claude Strauss

90. Michel Foucault
91. Jacques Derrida

New Scientists
92. Emile Durkheim

93. Albert Einstein
94. Karl Popper
95. Kurt Godel
96. Alan Turing
97. Burrhus Skinner
98. Thomas Kuhn §
99. Paul Feyerabend
100. W.V.O. Quine

References

  1. Philip Stokes – Hmolpedia 2020.
  2. Stokes, Philip. (2002). Philosophy 100: Essential Thinkers. Publisher, 2012.
  3. Fowler, Michael. (1997). “Historical Beginnings of Theories of Electricity and Magnetism” (Ѻ), University of Virginia, Physics.

External links

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