Sadi Carnot

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Sadi Carnot (1830) ns.jpg

In existographies, Sadi Carnot (159-123 BE) (1796-1832 ACM) (IQ:190|#25) (ID:5.28|36) (Cattell 1000:345) (RGM:793|1,350+) (PR:1,821|65AE / engineer:6) (EP:40) (TR:428) (LH:29) (TL:469|#10) was a French engineer and philosopher, noted for being the originator of the science of thermodynamics.

Overview

A photo of Carnot talking about the "working substance".

In 1824, Carnot, in his Reflections on the Motive Power of Fire: and on Machines Fitted to Develop that Power, a short self-published booklet, on the generalized theory of heat engines, introduced core engineering physical models, namely: Carnot engine, Carnot cycle, and Carnot's principle, the latter of which being precursor to the second law of thermodynamics. The term Carnotian revolution refers to the revolution brought about in science in century to follow Carnot's Reflections.

Quotes

Quotes | On

The following are quotes on Carnot:

Carnot's On the Motive Power of Fire is the most original work ever written in the physical sciences, with a core of abstraction comparable to the best of Galileo.”
Tom Shachtman (1999), Absolute Zero and the Quest for Absolute Cold (pgs. 79)[1]

Quotes | By

The following are quotes by Carnot:

“Say little about what you know and nothing at all about what you don’t know. When a discussion degenerates into a dispute, keep silent. Do not do anything which the whole world cannot know about.”
— Sadi Carnot (c.1820), “Rules of Conduct”, personal notes [2]

End matter

References

  1. Shachtman, Tom. (1999). Absolute Zero and the Quest for Absolute Cold (pgs. 79). Mariner Books.
  2. (a) Personal notes of Sadi Carnot (category: rules of conduct).
    (b) Carnot, Sadi. (1824). Reflections on the Motive Power of Fire: and on Machines Fitted to Develop that Power (editor: Eric Mendoza). Dover, 1960.

Works

External links

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