Physico-chemically neutral

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In terms, physico-chemically neutral (LH:#), acronym: PCN, refers to terms that are "neutral", physico-chemically speaking, i.e. are universally employable, in respect to physics and chemistry, and or chemical thermodynamics, i.e. physical chemistry; terms that are deanthropomorphized in respect to human bias.

Overview

In 2012, Libb Thims, in the Journal of Human Thermodynamics (JHT), initiated so-called “JHT life terminology upgrade protocol”, wherein any terms, life-related terms in particular, not recognized by physics, chemistry, and or thermodynamics, which have a “non-neutral” point of view, as concerns human bias, were edited out and replaced by “physico-chemically neutral”, chemically-neutral, or chemical thermodynamically neutral acceptable terms. The following is a 2013 version of the so-called PCN editorial note:

“All life-terms, e.g. bio-, living, alive, etc., and their antonyms, e.g. dead, death, non-life, etc., per 2012-initiated JHT life terminology upgrade protocol — typified by the keen discernment that: “chemistry does not know the word life” (Sherrington, 1938) — have been editorially redacted and or clarified with brackets into the chemical thermodynamically ‘neutral’ terminology. Defunct terms, such as ‘plant life’ and ‘animal life’, e.g., have been rephrased as CHNOPS+ systems or molecules, respectively; defunct process conceptions such as ‘birth’ and ‘death’, e.g., have been redacted into the chemically-neutral equivalents of synthesis and analysis, respectively, terms applicable hydrogen to human.”
— Libb Thims (2013), “Note 1a” to Mohsen Mohsen-Nia’s “Social Equation of State”[1]

In 2014, Thims, following his encounter with so-called "physico-chemical sociology"[2] work of Arshad Beg, began employ the term "physico-chemically neutral", in a predominate sense, in respect to the more unwieldy terms: "chemical thermodynamically neutral" or "chemically-neutral equivalents", as show employed above.

End matter

References

  1. Mohsen-Nia, Mohsen. (2013), “Social Equation of State” (pdf), Journal of Human Thermodynamics, 9(2):29-42.
  2. Physicochemical sociology – Hmolpedia 2020.
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