Mechanical equivalent of heat

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In terms, mechanical equivalent of heat (TR:170) (LH:10) (TL:180) refers to []

Quotes

The following are related quotes:

“The mechanical equivalents of heat determined by the various series of experiments given in this paper are 823, 795, 820, 814, and 760. The mean of the last three, which I take as least liable to error, is 798 lb, a result so near 838 lbs, the equivalent which I deduced from my magnetical experiments, as to confirm, in a remarkable manner, the above explanation of the phenomena described in this paper, and to afford a new and, to my mind, powerful argument in favor of the ‘dynamical theory of heat’ which originated with Bacon, Newton, and Boyle, and has been at a later period so well supported by the experiments of Rumford, Davy, and Forbes.”
James Joule (1844), “On the Changes of Temperature produced by the Rarefaction and Condensation of Air” (pg. 187)[1]

End matter

References

  1. (a) Joule, James. (1844). “On the Changes of Temperature produced by the Rarefaction and Condensation of Air” (abstract) (by: Dr. Roget) (note: paper, supposedly was rejected by Royal Society), Proceedings of the Royal Society, Jun 20; published in: Philosophical Magazine, 3; May; both in: Scientific Papers, Volume One (pg. 171-89; quote, pg. 189). Publisher.
    (b) Cardwell, Donald. (1971). From Watt to Clausius: the Rise of Thermodynamics in the Early Industrial Age (pg. 235; image, plate 23). Cornell University Press.

External links

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