Marcus Varro

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In existographies, Marcus Varro (2071-1982 BE) (116-27 BCM) (619-708 AUC) (IQ:175|#340) (ID:1.97|89) (Cattell 1000:427) (PR:2,556|65AE / writer:265) (CR:4) (LH:6) (TL:10) was a Roman scholar, politician, and philosopher, noted for []

Overview

Vis (force) of Venus = Vita (life)

In 120BC, Lucilius wrote the following:

Life is force you see: to do everything force doth compel us.” [English]
Vis est vita vides? Vis nos facere omnia cogit.” [Latin]
— Lucilius (120BC), Publications (pg. #)

In 50BC, Varro, in his On the Latin Language, cited the above quote by Lucilius, to argue the following:

“The poets, in that they say that the very seed fell from the sky into the sea and Venus was born ‘from the foam masses’, through the conjunction of fire and moisture, are indicating that the vis or ‘force’ which they have is that of Venus [Aphrodite]. Those born of vis have what is called vita, ‘life’, and that is what is meant by Lucilius (c.120BC) when he says: ‘life is force you see: to do everything force doth compel us’.”
— Marcus Varro (c.50BC), On the Latin Language: On the Science and Origin of Words, Addressed to Cicero, Volume One (pg. 61) [1]

In 2014, Jay Fisher, in his The Annals of Quintus Ennius and the Italian Tradition, comments on the Varro argument about the "vis of Venus" model of life, as follows:

“According to at least one Roman writer, ‘vis’ and ‘vita’ may be both elements of a traditional collocation and derivations of the same root. Varro’s claim that the vita is given to children by the vis of Venus may be an implicit etymology.”
— Jay Fisher (2014), The Annals of Quintus Ennius and the Italian Tradition (pg. 152) [2]

In sum, according to Lucilius, Varro, and Fisher, the "Roman theory of life", which they adopted from the "Greek theory of life", aka Aphrodite model, which is adopted from the "Egyptian theory of life", aka Hathor model, is that life is the result of what the force compels us to do.

Maxwell model

The new force, however, is no longer the "vis" of Venus, but the "electromagnetic force" of Maxwell. The new so-called "Maxwell theory of life", is poetically summarized as follows:

“We, that is, all the work we’ve done, as ‘waves in ether [spacetime]’, shall for ever run”
James Maxwell (1878), “A Paradoxical Ode: After Shelley” [3]

The term "life", which is obviated, i.e. removed (a need or difficulty), in the new Maxwellian view, becomes replaced by: "work done, by the electromagnetic force, in the form of waves in spacetime".

Varronian calendar

In 50 BC (703 AUC), Varro, amid the rise of the formation of the republic or city of Rome, as outlined below[4], invents the Anno Urbis Conditae (AUC) dating system, meaning “from city [of Rome] founding” (Anno Urbis Conditae):

  • 753 BC - The city of Rome is founded.
  • 509 BC - Rome becomes a republic.
  • 218 BC - Hannibal invades Italy.
  • 73 BC - Spartacus the gladiator leads the slaves in an uprising.
  • 50 BC - Varro devises his Anno Urbis Conditae (AUC) dating system
  • 45 BC - Julius Caesar becomes the first dictator of Rome.
  • 44 BC - Julius Caesar is assassinated on the Ides of March by Marcus Brutus.
  • 27 BC - The Roman Empire begins as Caesar Augustus becomes the first Roman Emperor.
  • 64 AD - Much of Rome burns. Legend has it that Emperor Nero watched the city burn while playing a lyre.

This eventually became replaced with the Dionysian calendar (525AD), which eventually became replaced with the Thimsian calendar (2020AD).

Quotes

Quotes | On

The following are quotes on Varro:

“What good can we suppose it did Varro and Aristotle to know so many things?”
Michel Montaigne (1580), “An Apology for Raymond Sebond” [5]

End matter

References

  1. (a) Varro, Marcus. (c.50BC). On the Latin Language: On the Science and the Origin of Words, Addressed to Cicero, Volume One (pg. 61), Volume Two (editor: G.P. Goold). Harvard University Press, 1938.
    (b) Fisher, Jay. (2014). The Annals of Quintus Ennius: and the Italic Tradition (vis est vita, pg. 152). JHT Press.
  2. Fisher, Jay. (2014). The Annals of Quintus Ennius and the Italic Tradition (vis est vita, pg. 152). JHT Press.
  3. A Paradoxical Ode – Hmolpedia 2020.
  4. Ancient Rome timeline – Ducksters.com.
  5. (a) Montaigne, Michel. (1580). “An Apology for Raymond Sebond”; in: The Complete Works (translator: Donald Frame) (Varro and Aristotle, pg. 435). Everyman’s Library, 2003.
    (b) Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (Varro and Aristotle, pg. 298). HarperOne.

External links

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