Lewis Terman

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In existographies, Lewis Terman (78 BE-1 AE) (1877-1956 ACM) (IQ:#|#) (CR:93) (LH:18) (TL:113|#94) was an American psychologist and genius studies pioneer, noted for his 1916 invention of the "IQ scale".

Overview

In 1916, Terman, in his The Measurement of Intelligence: an Explanation of and a Complete Guide for he Use of the Stanford Guide for the Use of the Stanford Revision and Extension of the Binet-Simon Intelligence Scale, took William Stern's age-based 1912 "IQ" (intelligence quotient) concept and transforming into into a 200-point general intelligence scale, aka “IQ scale”, ranging from 0 (no intelligence), 100 (average intelligence), and 140+ (genius level intelligence).[1]

In early 1920s, Terman supervised Catherine Cox, his PhD student, in her study the top 300 geniuses, from the Cattell 1000, who assigned retrospectively calculated IQs to each person (Cox IQ), as summarized in her Early Mental Traits of 300 Geniuses (1926).

1921 to 1928, Terman collected, via his cross-country testing children population wide, a select group of 1,528 children (856 males and 672 females), mean age 11, or about age 6 to 12 or so, who he labeled as "gifted", assigning each with "genius IQs" (140+), mean IQ 151, with 77 between 177 and 200, who were thereafter studied as they aged, in the so-called “Termanites” study, which continued for about century.

Quotes

Quotes | On

The following are quotes on Terman:

“As is well known, few, if any, of these [1,528 top 1% Terman] children grew up to become recognized geniuses. Not one, for example, received a Nobel Prize. Ironically, two boys who were rejected from the sample — because they were deemed not intellectually gifted enough — later won Nobel Prizes in physics, namely William Shockley and Walter Alvarez.”
Dean Simonton (2016), “Reverse Engineering Genius” (pg. 1)[2]

Quotes | By

The following are quotes by Terman:

“An individual is ‘intelligent’ in proportion as he is able to carry on abstract thinking.”
— Lewis Terman (1921), “Intelligence and its measurement” (pg. 128) [3]
“There is nothing about an individual as important as his IQ, except his morals.”
— Lewis Terman (1922), “Were We Born That Way?” (pg. 657) [4]

See also

References

  1. Terman, Lewis. (1916). The Measurement of Intelligence: an Explanation of and a Complete Guide for he Use of the Stanford Guide for the Use of the Stanford Revision and Extension of the Binet-Simon Intelligence Scale (I.Q., pg. 53, etc.). Houghton Mifflin Co.
  2. Simonton, Dean. (2016), “Reverse Engineering Genius: Historiometric Studies of Superlative Talent” (pdf), Annals of the New York Academy of Science, xxxx:1-7.
  3. (a) Terman, Lewis. (1921). “Intelligence and its measurement” (pg. 128); A symposium,  Journal of Educational Psychology, 12:127-133.
    (b) Warner, Russell. (2018). “An Evaluation (and Vindication?) of Lewis Terman: What the Father of Gifted Education Can Teach the 21st Century” (Ѻ), Gifted Child Quarterly, Oct 14.
  4. (a) Terman, Lewis. (1922). “Were We Born That Way?” (pg. 657), Worlds Work, 44:649-60.
    (b) Castles, Elaine E. (2012). Inventing intelligence: How American Came to Worship IQ (pg. 3). ABC Clio.
    (c) Warner, Russell. (2018). “An Evaluation (and Vindication?) of Lewis Terman: What the Father of Gifted Education Can Teach the 21st Century” (Ѻ), Gifted Child Quarterly, Oct 14.

External links

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