Jeffrey Tuhtan

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In existographies, Jeffrey Tuhtan (24- AE) (1976- ACM) (CR:5) (LH:1) (TL:6) is an American-born German ecohydraulic engineer, noted for []

Quotes

Quotes | Employed

The following are quotes employed by Tuhtan:

“All bodies of nature, even if they seem to be completely at rest, are nevertheless in the most lively inner movement.”
Rudolf Clausius (1857), Publication (Zurich); cited by Jeffrey Tuhtan (2012) in A Modelling Approach for Alpine Rivers Impacted by Hydropeaking: Including the Second Law Inequality (opening quote[1], pg. ii)

Quotes | By

The following are quotes by Tuhtan:

Thims' The Human Molecule [2008] covers the most fundamental change in human knowledge since Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, by presenting a theory that we are fundamentally ‘molecules’, and that the ‘question of life’ [?] itself is a fundamentally flawed one. Especially important is the carefully laid out historical narrative of how Thims came to his theory of the human as a molecule. Whether you ultimately agree with this work or not, it represents a paradigm shift in viewing our place in the world.”
— Jeffrey Tuhtan (2011), Amazon Review of The Human Molecule, Jan 28[2]
“This work is the result of an irreversible and path-dependent process. Along the way, I have had the great fortune of being accompanied and inspired by a wide and wonderful ensemble, including: Georgi Gladyshev, for his patience in explaining the often overlooked point in thermodynamics that ‘G often matters much more than S’. Adrian Bejan, for his kind support of my novel suggestion that thermodynamics of alpine fish locomotion can be elucidated using constructal theory. Libb Thims for taking the time to introduce me to the rapidly developing world of animate thermodynamics.”
— Jeff Tuhtan (2012), A Modelling Approach for Alpine Rivers Impacted by Hydropeaking: Including the Second Law Inequality (pg. i)
“The human species is but one of many. Viewed from a sort of universal microscope, we appear as but a vast collection of molecules in motion. In our current state we are firmly attached to an Earthly substrate, feeding off the energy gradient of the Sun. The fate of our chemical species is undeniably tied to the affinities and energies of interaction required to maintain our evolving earth ecosystem. We live in a closed system. In order to understand the nature of things, we must learn more about both our reactions and our products.”
— Jeffrey Tuhtan (2012), A Modelling Approach for Alpine Rivers Impacted by Hydropeaking: Including the Second Law Inequality (pg. 1); cited by Libb Thims (2013) in his NIU lecture “A Guidemap to Human Chemical Thermodynamics: Goethe's Elective Affinities to Human Free Energies” [3]
“The inspiration of this work is taken from Mauersberger’s (1985) thought-provoking application of Planck’s theory of dilute solutions applied to aquatic ecosystems. The bold step is taken suggesting that aquatic ecosystems follow the same physical laws as their inanimate molecular counterparts, and we can thus use the science of energy, thermodynamics as the common language in describing their roles and interactions within the ecosystem. Additionally vital is the fundamental contribution of Bauer (1920) which provides a nonequilibrium definition of animate systems. Bauer is one of the first to have the insight that organisms have a place in the fundamental Gibbs equation. Concepts relating thermodynamics to animate system behavior are taken from the works of: Boltzmann, Clausius, Schrodinger, Jorgensen, Gladyshev, Zotin, Sterner, Elser, Morowitz, Glaser, Mauersberger, Ebeling, Katchalsky, Bejan, Ulanowicz, Mikulecky, Rosen, Elsasser and most recently Thims. These unique researchers have boldly taken chemical or thermodynamic stances when contemplating animate systems development, often inviting great controversy.”
— Jeffrey Tuhtan (2012), A Modelling Approach for Alpine Rivers Impacted by Hydropeaking: Including the Second Law Inequality (pg. 1)
“Origins: probably 4-5 yrs old, I believed that I came from some sort of light source, probably the sun. My first word was also "light". Life and death: I grew up in the country, so we had dead animals around all the time. Probably 6 or so before I thought about my own death as inevitable. Existence: I neglected this question until coming across your Human Molecule book at around age 30. I don't believe in the common sense notion of life. There does not seem to be any evidence that I am alive.”
— Jeff Tuhtan (2013), response to query on “big questions” recollections (see: belief system (children))[4]

End matter

References

  1. Note (quote in German): “Alle Korper der Natur, auch wenn sie vollkommen in Ruhe zu sein scheinen, befinden sich doch in der lebhaftesten inneren Bewegung.”
  2. Tuhtan, Jeff. (2011). “Review: The Human Molecule”, Amazon.com Reviews, Jan 28.
  3. (a) Tuhtan, Jeffrey. (2012). A Modelling Approach for Alpine Rivers Impacted by Hydropeaking: Including the Second Law Inequality (abs) (pg. 1). Stuttgart University.
    (b) Thims, Libb. (2013). “A Guidemap to Human Chemical Thermodynamics: Goethe's Elective Affinities to Human Free Energies” (abs) (NIU seminar) (cover) (main) (YT) (abs video), Lecture to mechanical engineering thermodynamics students (professor: Milivoje Kostic), Northern Illinois University (NIU), Apr 16.
  4. Tuhtan, Jeffrey. (2013). “Hmolpedia message to Libb Thims”, Apr 23.

External links

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