Jacob Leachman

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In existographies, Jacob Leachman (27- AE) (1982- ACM) (FET:61) (SPE:49|66AE) (CR:10) (LH:2) (TL:12) is an American mechanical engineer, thermodynamicist, and philosopher, noted for his 2016 to 2017 blog articles on "social thermodynamics".

Overview

In 2009, DARPA, the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, under program manager Todd Hylton, funded various research teams to develop a "physical intelligence" model, based on thermodynamics, using chemistry and electrical components, an upgrade to "artificial intelligence" (AI), themed presumably on the Neumann automaton model.[1]

In Mar 2016, DARPA, announced they were giving out a so-called “Next Generation Social Science” (NGS2) federal grants, and that they were “soliciting innovative research proposals to build a new capability (methods, models, tools, and a community of researchers) to perform rigorous, reproducible experimental research at scales necessary to understand emergent properties of human social systems”.[2]

Empathy Entropy

The 2017 draft cover for Leachman's draft book Empathy Entropy, written in outline form, as a series of about 15 blogs on "social thermodynamics" with respect to empathy. [3]

In Apr 2016 to Aug 2017, Leachman, stimulated by the premise of getting federal funding for research on a next generation of social science, on the premise of the development of an "integral psychology", based on thermodynamics, that would yield experimental results that would be reproducible, blogged a series of twelve articles surrounding what he called "thoughts on social thermodynamics", touching on topics such as social phase change, social Chatelier principle, political thermodynamics, derivative properties, social temperature, thermodynamics and evolution, wealth inequality, along with the thermodynamics of love, empathy, autism, and parties. The following are the main blogs, aimed at book entitled Empathy Entropy[3], draft cover shown adjacent:

  1. Leachman, Jacob. (2016). “Initial Thoughts on the Thermodynamics of Societal Phase Change” (Ѻ), Washington State University, Hyper Lab Blog, Apr 7.
  2. Leachman, Jacob. (2016). “More Thoughts on the Thermodynamics of Societal Phase Change” (Ѻ), Washington State University, Hyper Lab Blog, Sep 6.
  3. Leachman, Jacob. (2016). “Thermodynamics of Social Change 3: Le Chatelier’s Principle of Reactions” (Ѻ), Washington State University, Hyper Lab Blog, Sep 18.
  4. Leachman, Jacob. (2016). “Using Design Theory to Explain our Political System and Trump” (Ѻ), Washington State University, Hyper Lab Blog, Nov 9.
  5. Leachman, Jacob. (2016). “Social Thermodynamics: Derivative Properties” (Ѻ), Washington State University, Hyper Lab Blog, Nov 11.
  6. Leachman, Jacob. (2016). “A Thanksgiving Blessing: Social Thermodynamics Style” (Ѻ), Washington State University, Hyper Lab Blog, Nov 23.
  7. Leachman, Jacob. (2017). “Social Thermodynamics: Sophistication versus Evolution” (Ѻ), Washington State University, Hyper Lab Blog, Mar 28.
  8. Leachman, Jacob. (2017). “Social Thermodynamics: Temperature and Wealth Inequality” (Ѻ), Washington State University, Hyper Lab Blog, Apr 20.
  9. Leachman, Jacob. (2017). “Social Thermodynamics: a Belated Introduction” (Ѻ), Washington State University, Hyper Lab Blog, Jun 19.
  10. Leachman, Jacob. (2017). “Social Thermodynamics: Of Values, Work, and a First Law of Humanity” (Ѻ), Hyper Laboratory, Washington State University, Jul 12.
  11. Leachman, Jacob. (2017). “Social Thermodynamics: Empathy Scaffolding, Social Media, and the Second Law of Humanity” (Ѻ), Hyper Laboratory, Washington State University, Jul 14.
  12. Leachman, Jacob. (2017). “Social Thermodynamics: the Chapter of Love” (Ѻ), Washington State University, Hyper Lab Blog, Jul 26.
  13. Leachman, Jacob. (2017). “Social Thermodynamics: Empathy for Autism Spectrum Disorders” (Ѻ), Washington State University, Hyper Lab Blog, Aug 11.
  14. Leachman, Jacob. (2017). “Social Thermodynamics: Gibbs and the Energy for Change” (Ѻ), Hyper Laboratory, Washington State University, Aug 24.
  15. Leachman, Jacob. (2017). “Social Thermodynamics: the Size of the Party Next Door” (Ѻ), Washington State University, Hyper Lab Blog, Aug 25.
  16. Leachman, Jacob. (2017). “Social Thermodynamics: The Beginning and the End” (Ѻ), Hyper Laboratory, Washington State University, Sep 30.

Amid the writing of his blog articles, Libb Thims came across Leachman's work, eventually suggesting that he collect his ideas into a small booklet, and pointed him to the historical "human thermodynamics variable tables" (HTV table)[4], a practice originated by Irving Fisher (1892), who studied under Gibbs, and explaining that these HTV tables were a mandatory requirement for all articles submitted to the JHT. Leachman's progress, at this point, however, seems to have stalled out, with him commenting that he might turn his ideas into a science fiction novel, or something along these lines, down the road?

Education

In 2005, Leachman completed his BS in mechanical engineering, followed by his MS in mechanical engineering, in 2007, with a thesis on “Fundamental Equations of State for Parahydrogen, Normal Hydrogen, and Orthohydrogen”, both at the University of Idaho, and in 2011 completed his PhD in mechanical engineering, with a dissertation on: “Thermophysical Properties and Modeling of Hydrogenic Pellet Production Systems”, with a minor in nuclear engineering and engineering physics, in at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Presently, Leachman is an engineering professor with the Mechanical and Materials Engineering department of Washington State University, working on hydrogen fuel research.

End matter

See also

   

References

  1. Physical intelligence – Hmolpedia 2020.
  2. Next Generation Social Science (NGS2) (2016) – FederalGrants.com.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Leachman, Jacob. (2017). Empathy Entropy (contents). Washington State University.
  4. Human thermodynamics variables table – Hmolpedia 2020.
  5. Proxmire affair – Hmolpedia 2020.

Videos

  • Leachman, Jacob. (2014). “The Future of Universities Is …” (YT), TEDx Talks, Jun 2.

External links

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