Hubert Harrison

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In existographies, Hubert Harrison (72-28 BE) (1883-1927 ACM) (IQ:140|#1,043) (GBG:5) (FA:128) (CR:3) (LH:#) (TL:#) was an American writer, philosopher, and educator; characterized an “intellectual giant” (Rogers, 1947)[1], “black atheist” (Jackson, 1987)[2], and “black Socrates” (Hecht, 2003)[3]; noted for []

Overview

Harrison’s main intellectual hero was Thomas Paine. Harrison was well-read in the works of: Galileo, Rene Descartes, Newton, David Hume, Benedict Spinoza, Denis Diderot, Jean Alembert, Voltaire, and Baron Holbach. [4]

Education

Harrison, as a teen worked as an under-teacher of a school, in his young adulthood he worked menial jobs by day, e.g. a post office worker, earned a high school degree, and read voraciously.[4]

Quotes

Quotes | By

The following are noted quotes by Harrison:

“I doubt that I will ever be anything but an honest agnostic, because I prefer to go to the grave with my eyes open.”
— Hubert Harrison (1908), “Letter to Frances Keyser”, May[5]
“Everyone knows about the many errors in the Bible, except in America.”
— Hubert Harrison (c.1920), Publication [6]
“African Americans with agnostic views are rare, and these are seldom, if ever, openly avowed. I am inclined to believe that freedom of thought must come from freedom of circumstances.”
— Hubert Harrison (c.1920), Publication [6]
“It should seem that Negros, of all Americans, would be found in the ‘free thought’ fold, since they have suffered more than any other class of Americans from the dubious blessings of Christianity. The church saw to it that the religion taught to slaves should stress the servile virtues of subservience and content. It was the Bible that constituted the divine sanction of this ‘peculiar institution’.”
— Hubert Harrison (c.1920), Publication [6]
“These French deists made certain false premise which we smile at today; they believed in keeping monotheism, but fixing it, which is absurd.”
— Hubert Harrison (c.1920), Publication [4]
“I am agnostic; not a dogmatic disbeliever nor a bumptious and narrow infidel. I am not at all of Ingersoll’s school. I am agnostic such as Huxley was.”
— Hubert Harrison (c.1920), Publication [4]
“I wish to admit here something that most agnostics are unwilling to admit, namely that reason alone has failed to satisfy all my needs. For there are needs, not merely ethical but spiritual, inspirational, and these also must be filled.”
— Hubert Harrison (c.1920), Publication [6]

References

  1. Rogers, Joel. (1947). “Hubert Henry Harrison: Intellectual Giant and Free-Lance Educator”, in: World’s Great Men of Color, Volume Two (pg. 432-42). Publisher.
  2. Jackson, John G. (1987). Hubert Henry Harrison: the Black Socrates (Amz) (7-pg pamphlet). American Atheist Press.
  3. Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (pg. 435-39). HarperOne.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (pg. 435-39). HarperOne.
  5. (a) Perry, Jeffrey. (2009). Hubert Harrison: the Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918 (pg. 106). Columbia.
    (b) Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (pg. 435-39). HarperOne.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 Huberman, Jack. (2007). The Quotable Atheist: Ammunition for Nonbelievers, Political Junkies, Gadflies, and those Generally Hell-Bound (Hubert Harrison, pg. #). Nation Books.

External links

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