Greatest African ethnicity geniuses

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In genius studies, greatest African ethnicity geniuses, shortcut key: (GAEG:#), refers to the greatest intellectual minds of Africa, African-born, or of recent cultural African ethnicity.

Overview

The following is a work in progress ranking of the greatest “geniuses” of black skin color, i.e. those whose melanin content is characteristic of recent proximal equatorial ethnicity, of all time:[1]

# Person IQ About Sex Country
Imhotep
(2635-2595BC)
[RGM:334|1,350+] Egyptian polymath, first architect, engineer, and physician in early history, who served under third dynasty king Djoser (Zoser) as chancellor to the pharaoh and high priest of the sun god Ra at Heliopolis, architect of the world’s first pyramid, the Step Pyramid at Saqqara; a possible main theorist behind the current world dominating Anunian theologies. M Egyptian
Akhenaten (c.1380-1335BC).png Akhenaten
(3335-3290 BE)
(c.1380-1335 BCM)
(IQ:170|#374↑) Political leader; the person who moved the world, or at least Egypt, from a henotheism-based state religion, i.e. one supreme god (see: supreme god timeline) + lesser gods, to monotheism-based state religion, one god (Aten), where god became, a few anthropomorphisms aside (e.g. Aten's finger), the the heat or energy of the sun; husband of Nefertiti (c.1370-1330BC) [RGM:656|1,350+]. M Egyptian
Frederick Douglass
(1818-1895)
[RGM:281|1,350+] American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman;
“You are not judged by the height you have risen, but from the depth you have climbed.”
— Friedrich Douglass (1881) (Ѻ)
“Douglass was beyond all comparison the ablest man whom the black race ever produced in our country, either among pure black or the class of mixed blood.”
— James Pond (1900), Eccentricities of Genius (pg. 29)

An top 150 genius (Singh, 2016) (Ѻ); Quora gauged (2015) (Ѻ), speculatively, with George Carver, at the possible intellectual level of Newton, given social impediments.

M American
William Du Bois
(1868-1963)
Sociologist, historian, novelist, playwright, and cultural critic;
“The theology of the average colored church is basing itself far too much upon 'Hell and Damnation'—upon an attempt to scare people into being decent and threatening them with the terrors of death and punishment. We are still trained to believe a good deal that is simply childish in theology. The outward and visible punishment of every wrong deed that men do, the repeated declaration that anything can be gotten by anyone at any time by prayer.”
— William du Bois (c.1950), “On Christianity” (Ѻ)

mentored (Ѻ) at Harvard by William James; noted for his “brilliant and seminal” (Jacoby, 2004) The Souls of Black Folks, wherein he prophesies that the problem (Ѻ) of the 20th century is the problem of the color-line, in which he argues against Booker Washington’s model of education and progress for black men being solely focused on industrial education, instead advocating the addition of a classical education to establish leaders and educators in the black community; name-dropped in the film Akeelah and the Bee (2006); a DeBoisopedia (2013) (Ѻ) was attempted on him.

M American
Hubert Harrison
(1883-1927)
M American
Martin King
(1929-1968)
[RGM:139|1,350+] M American
George Carver
(c.1865-1943)
[RGM:770|1,350+] M American
Hatshepsut
(1507-1458)
[RGM:916|1,350+] M Egyptian
Alexandre Dumas
(1802-1870)
(Gottlieb 1000:874) (WorldCat 100:44) Writer;
“The career of Frederick Douglass is more widely known than that of any other living colored man, except, perhaps, Alexandre Dumas.”
— William Brown (1863), The Black Man: His Antecedents, His Genius, and His Achievements [2]
M French
James Baldwin
(1924-1987)
M American
Booker Washington
(1856-1915)
M American
Marcus Garvey
(1887-1940)
M Jamaican
Percy Julian

(1899-1975)

Chemist; noted for his 1935 synthesis of the drug physostigmine (beating out Robert Robinson, who incorrectly claimed synthesis before him), previously only available from its natural source, the Calabar bean; after which glaucoma began to be treatable (Ѻ); and for later work on soybean chemicals and steroids; first-slating: IQ:155 after watching first 47-min of 2007 PBS NOVA documentary: Percy Julian: Forgotten Genius (Nov 2020). M American
Ayaan Ali
(1969-)
[RGM:436|1,350+] F Somali-born Dutch-American
Barack Obama
(1961-)
[RGM:1,130|1,350+] M American
Malcolm Little
(1925-1965)
[RGM:1,114|1,350+] Civil rights leader;
“Education is the passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today.”
— Malcolm X (1964), “Speech at the Founding Rally of the Organization of Afro-American Unity”, Jun 28 (Ѻ)

At age 20, with only an 8th grade education, while in prison, taught himself (Ѻ) to read, write and speak English, by copying page after page from a dictionary into his notebook, A through Z; his Autobiography of Malcolm X (1865) is said to “blow people away”, particularly in the context of his genius (Ѻ).

M American
Neil Tyson.png Neil Tyson
(3- AE)
(1958- ACM)
[RGM:760|1,350+) M American
Thomas Sowell
(1930-)
[RGM:899|1,350+] Economist and social theorist; pretty intelligent, as per this MLB video. M American
Benjamin Bradley
(c.1830-1895)
M American
Langston Hughes

(1902-1967)

Poet; characterized (Ѻ) as the William Blake of his generation (Popova, 2016).
Ben Carson
(1951-)
M American
Greydon Square
(1981-)
[FA:231] M American

End matter

References

  1. Greatest black geniuses (WikiFoundry subdomain) – Hmolpedia 2020.
  2. Brown, William. (1863). The Black Man: His Antecedents, His Genius, and His Achievements (pg. 181). Thomas Hamilton.

Further reading

  • Haber, Louis. (1910). Black Pioneers of Science and Invention (Amz). Publisher, 1992.

External links


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