Georg Stahl

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In existographies, Georg Stahl (296-221 BE) (1659-1734 ACM) (IQ:170|#404) (ID:2.30|74) (PR:8683|65AE / chemist:116) (GCE:#) (CR:33) (LH:4) (TL:37) German chemist, physician, and philosopher, noted for noted for his 1703 "phlogiston" model of combustion, and for his 1708 theory about the "soul" animating non-living matter.

Overview

Phlogiston

In 1703, Stahl, building on the "oak tree burning experiment" of Johann Helmont (c.1620) and "three earths principle" of Johann Becher (1669), who theorized that earth was made of three principles, firstly: “terra pinguis”, a fatty, oily material substance, which gave things the property of combustion, and second: "terra lapidist", lastly: "terra fluida", theorized that when a metal burns it transforms into "calx" and what he called "phlogiston" as follows:

where "phlogiston", from the Greek phlogios, meaning ‘fiery’, both phi- rooted words, was Becher's terra pinguis, reformulated.

Soul

In 1708, Stahl, in his True Medical Theory, outlined an "animism theory", according to which life and disease were explained by the action of the “sensitive soul” or anima, which inhabited every part of the organism.[1]

Sways

Influences

Stahl was influenced by: Johann Helmont and Johann Becher.

Influenced

Stahl influenced: William Cullen and Friedrich Medicus.

Quotes

The following are quotes:

“One trend, in respect to organism and mechanism, derived from the teachings of Georg Stahl, who looked upon the immaterial ‘soul’ as the agency that animated non-living material systems by organizing, regulating and directing them. As Medicus saw it, Stahl exaggerated the commanding control of the soul over all manifestations of life. But Medicus was not happy about the other tendency either. As Medicus saw it, Stahl exaggerated the commanding control of the soul over all manifestations of life. Medicus considered Friedrich Hoffmann (1660-1742), Hermann Boerhaave, and Albrecht Haller as the leading [thinkers]. Medicus was aware of this implied relatedness of the soul and the vital force and, therefore, sought to distinguish between them in a threefold way.”
— Mikulas Teich (1992), A Documentary History of Biochemistry, 1770-1940 (pg. 438)[2]

End matter

References

  1. Ackernecht, Erwin. (1982). A Short History of Medicine (pg. 128). JHU.
  2. Teich, Mikulas. (1992). A Documentary History of Biochemistry, 1770-1940 (pg. 438). Fairleigh.

External links

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