Friedrich Nietzsche

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In existographies, Friedrich Nietzsche (111-55 BE) (1844-1900 ACM) (IQ:190|#29) (RGM:39|1,350+) (Murray 4000:15|WP) (Perry 80:7|Li) (RMS:82) (FA:138) (GAE:2) (GPhE:#) (EPD:F5) (TR:329) (LH:7) (TL:336) was a German philosopher, noted for []

Overview

Human, All Too Human

In 1878, Nietzsche, in his Human, All Too Human, §1: “Chemistry and the Notion of the Feelings”, opened to the following aphorism #1 (of 1,400 aphorisms):

“All that we need and that could possibly be given us in the present state of development of the sciences, is a chemistry of the ‘moral’, ‘religious’, ‘aesthetic’ conceptions and feeling, as well as of those ‘emotions’ which we experience in the affairs, great and small, of society and civilization, and which we are sensible of even in solitude. But what if this chemistry established the fact that, even in its domain, the most magnificent results were attained with the basest and most despised ingredients? Would many feel disposed to continue such investigations? Mankind loves to put by the questions of its origin and beginning: must one not be almost inhuman in order to follow the opposite course?”.”
— Friedrich Nietzsche (1878), Human, All Too Human (§1) (translator: Google)[1]

Alternative translations:

“All we require, and what can be given us only now the individual sciences have attained their present level, is a chemistry of the moral, religious and aesthetic conceptions and sensations, likewise of all the agitations we experience within ourselves in cultural and social intercourse, and indeed even when we are alone.”
— Friedrich Nietzsche (1878), Human, All Too Human (§1) (translator: Reginald Hollingdale [1986])[2]
“All that we need and that could possibly be given us in the present state of development of the sciences, is a chemistry of the moral, religious, aesthetic conceptions and feeling, as well as of those emotions which we experience in the affairs, great and small, of society and civilization, and which we are sensible of even in solitude.”
— Friedrich Nietzsche (1878), Human, All Too Human (§1) (translator: Alexander Harvey [1908])

What we need, according to Nietzsche (1878), in short, is a chemistry, or physical chemistry, of: morals, religion, aesthetics [principles of beauty], feelings, emotions, affairs, society, civilization, and individualism. Who will answer this call?

End

On 3 Jan 1889, Nietzsche, age 45, suffered a mental breakdown, after he witnessed the flogging of a horse at the opposite end of a piazza; he is reported to have run over to the horse and held it in his arm to protect it before he collapsed to the ground. He never recovered, dereacting (dying) the following year.

Quotes

Quotes | By

The following are quotes by Nietzsche:

“Kant, Schopenhauer, and this book [History of Materialism, 1865] by Lange. I don’t need anything else.”
— Friedrich Nietzsche (1866), “Letter to Friend”[3]
“If I am to describe what an event my first glance at Schopenhauer's writings was for me, I must dwell for a moment on an idea which used to come to me in my youth more pressingly, and more frequently, than perhaps any other. When in those days I roved as I pleased through wishes of all kinds, I always believed that sometime fate would take from me the terrible effort and duty of educating myself: I believed that, when the time came, I would discover a philosopher to educate me, a true philosopher whom one could follow without any misgiving because one would have more faith in him than one had in oneself. Schopenhauer produced upon me, that magical outpouring of the inner strength of one natural creature on to another that follows the first and most fleeting encounter; and when I subsequently analyze that impression I discover it to be compounded of three elements, the elements of his honesty, his cheerfulness and his steadfastness. He is honest because he speaks and writes to himself and for himself, cheerful because he has conquered the hardest task by thinking, and steadfast because he has to be.”
— Friedrich Nietzsche (1876), “Schopenhauer as Educator”[4]

End matter

References

  1. (a) Nietzsche, Friedrich. (1878). Human, All Too Human: a Book for Free Spirits (txt) (translator: Alexander Harvey) (§:Of first and last things, pg. #). Charles H. Kerr & Co., 1908.
    (b) Kaufmann, Walter A. (1950). Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist (§7.2:219). Princeton University Press, 2008.
    (c) Human, All Too Human – Wikipedia.
  2. Nietzsche, Friedrich. (1878). Human, All Too Human: a Book for Free Spirits (translator: Reginald Hollingdale; Introduction: Richard Schacht) (§:Of first and last things, pg. #). Cambridge University Press, 1986.
  3. Clark, Maudemarie. (2005). “Review: of Kevin Hill’s Nietzsche’s Critiques: the Kantian Foundations of his Thought”, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews, Jan 5.
  4. Nietzsche, Friedrich. (1876). “Schopenhauer as Educator”, in: Untimely Meditations, Volume Three (translator: Reginald Hollingdale) (txt). Publisher.
    (b) Malieth, Monydit (aka Tonnerre). (2013). The Future Affects the Past: What Destination is Time Rushing To? (pg. 62). Red Lead Books.

External links

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