Erasmus

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In existographies, Desiderius Erasmus (489-418 BE) (1466-1537 ACM) (IQ:185|#62↓) (ID:1.68|69) (Cattell 1000:56) (RGM:82|1,350+) (PR:202|65AE / philosopher:24) Becker 139:114|3L) (Gottlieb 1000:97) (Stokes 100:27) (Listal 100:52) (RMS:18) (CR:37) (LH:3) (TL:40) was a Dutch philosopher and theologian, aka “prince of the humanists”, noted for []

Overview

In 1466, Erasmus, aged 17, lost both his parents to a plague.

In 1530, Erasmus, in his On Civility in Children, a book dedicated to the instruction of noble youth, table manners, etc., defined “civility” as non-rude behavior. The term “civilization”, supposedly, derives from this publication.

Atomic theory

In c.1506, Erasmus attempted to reconcile Epicurus and Lucretius with Christianity.[1]

Praise of Folly

A caricature of Erasmus thumbing through his Praise of Folly.

In 1509, Erasmus, in his Praise of Folly, ridiculed the status quo belief in god; the following is one example:

“Could god have taken on the form of a woman, a devil, a donkey, a gourd, or a flintstone? If so, how could a gourd have preached sermons, performed miracles, and been nailed to the cross?”
— Desiderius Erasmus (1509), Praise of Folly[2]

This launched him into a debate with Martin Luther.

Pandora's box | Eve's apple

In c.1520, Erasmus introduced the term “Pandora’s box” into literature, supposedly making a connection between the golden apple of the Pandora story and the apple of eve, the snake, and the unleashing of evil (or original sin) to humans in the Garden of Eden of the Bible.

Sways

Influences

Erasmus was influenced by: Epicurus and Lucretius.

Influenced

Erasmus influenced: James Froude.

Quotes

Quotes | On

The following are quotes on Erasmus:

Erasmus, you foster in your heart a Lucian, or some other pig from Epicurus’ sty who, having no belief in god himself, secretly ridicules all who have a belief and confess it.”
Martin Luther (1525), On the Bondage of Will[3]
Erasmus advises students to read only the best books on the subjects with which they are occupied. He cautions them against loading their memories with the errors of inferior writers which they will afterwards have to throw off and forget.”
James Froude (1894), Life and Letters of Erasmus[4]
Erasmus was a man of universal genius whose rare capacities would have surfaced in any age and under any circumstances.”
— Daniel Robinson (1995), An Intellectual History of Psychology (pg. 137)

Quotes | By

The following are quotes:

“I consider as lovers of books not those who keep their books hidden in their store-chests and never handle them, but those who, by nightly as well as daily use thumb them, batter them, wear them out, who fill out all the margins with annotations of many kinds, and who prefer the marks of a fault they have erased to a neat copy full of faults.”
— Erasmus (1489), “Letter to unidentified friend” [5]
“You must acquire the best knowledge first, and without delay; it is the height of madness to learn what you will later have to unlearn.”
— Erasmus (1497), “Letter to Christian Northoff”[6]
“When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes.”
— Erasmus (1500), “Letter to Jacob Batt”, Apr 12; popularized variant of original[7]
“In the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.”
— Erasmus (1500), Publication[7]

End matter

See also

References

  1. Stenger, Victor J. (2013). God and the Atom: from Democritus to the Higgs Boson: the Story of a Triumphant Idea (pgs. 49, 55). Prometheus Books.
  2. Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (pg. 274). HarperOne.
  3. (a) Luther, Martin. (1525). On the Bondage of Will (De Servo Arbitrio). Publisher.
    (b) Watson, Philip S. (1969). Luther and Erasmus: Free Will and Salvation (pg. 109). Westminster.
    (c) Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (pg. 276). HarperOne.
  4. Froude, James. (1894). Life and Letters of Erasmus: Lectures Delivered at Oxford 1893-94 (pg. v). Longmans, Green, 1899.
  5. Erasmus, Desiderius. (1489). “Letter to unidentified friend” (Ѻ); in: Collected Works of Erasmus (pg. 114). Publisher, 1974.
  6. rasmus, Desiderius. (1489). “Letter to unidentified friend” (Ѻ); in: Collected Works of Erasmus (pg. 114). Publisher, 1974.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Desiderius Erasmus – WikiQuote.

External links

Videos

  • Anon. (2019). “Desiderius Erasmus: Short Biography” (YT), Famous People Bio, Jan 17.
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