Do

From Hmolpedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

In terms, do (LH:8) refers to []

Quotes

The following are quotes:

“Let us now consider, for a little while, how wonderfully we stand upon this world. Here it is we are born, bred, and live, and yet we view these things with an almost entire absence of wonder to ourselves respecting the way in which all this happens. So small, indeed, is our wonder, that we are never taken by surprise; and I do think that, to a young person of ten, fifteen or twenty years of age, perhaps the first sight of a cataract or a mountain would occasion him more surprise than he had ever felt concerning the means of his own existence: How he came here; how he lives; by what means he stands upright; and through what means he moves about from place to place. We come into this world, we live, and depart from it, without our thoughts being called specifically to consider how all this takes place; and were it not for the exertions of some few inquiring minds, who have looked into these things, and ascertained the very beautiful laws and conditions by which we do live and stand upon the earth, we should hardly be aware that there was anything wonderful in it. These inquiries, which have occupied philosophers from the earliest days, when they first began to find out the laws by which we grow, and exist, and enjoy ourselves, up to the present time, have shown us that all this was effected in consequence of the existence of certain forces, or abilities to do things, or powers, that are so common that nothing can be more so; for nothing is commoner than the wonderful powers by which we are enabled to stand upright: they are essential to our existence every moment.”
Michael Faraday (1859), On the Various Forces of Matter (pgs. 2-3) [1]
Anon: “What do you do?
Thims: “Why does anyone ‘do’ anything?”
Anon: “I don’t know?”
Thims: “That is what I do. Work on solving the problem as to why people do, anything[2], in the first place?”
Libb Thims (66AE), “Mental note”, jotted in notebook, while driving around, Aug 21

End matter

References

  1. Faraday, Michael. (1859). On the Various Forces of Matter: and their Relation to Each Other. Six lectures delivered before a juvenile auditory at the Royal Institute, during the Christmas Holidays of 1859-60 (pgs. 2-3). Griffin, 1861.
  2. Note: "vanity problem", drive-thru paradox, Faustian dilemma, among a few others, resound in this thought.
  3. Berlin, Amanda. (2014). “7 Better Ways to Answer: What Do You Do?” (WB), The Muse.

External links

  • do – Wiktionary.
Theta Delta ics T2.jpg