Dionysius Exiguus

From Hmolpedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Dionysius Exiguus.png

In existographies, Dionysius Exiguus (1485-1411 BE) (470-544 AD|ACM) (185-259 AM|AD)[1] (1223-1297 AUC)[2], cited as “Dionysius”, was a Roman monk and religious scholar, noted for his invention of the BC/AD dating system (aka Dionysian calendar) in 525 AD.

Overview

In 525AD (1260AUC), Dionysius, while updating an Easter Calendar, invented the BC/AD dating system, but left no description as to how he picked he "zero year" (or initial year). It became popular, in western Europe, after Bede, in his Ecclesiastical History of the English People (731), began to use it to date events; during the reign of Charlemagne (742-814), it became the state dating system, and usurped the previous AUC dating system, with a “from empire [of Rome] founding” dated dating, according to him to have begun at the approximate mid-point (6.5 BC) of the reign of Caesar Augustus, from 27 BC-14 AD, but overtly themed it as a “birth of Christ” dating system, to align with the then-established Christianity form of the state religion.

Quotes

Quotes | On

The following are quotes on Dionysius:

Dionysus anchored his dating system by counting years from: ‘Ab Incarnatione Domini Nostri Jesu Christi’ or from incarnation of Lord Jesus the Christ. In his attempt to calculate the year of the Messiah’s birth, he used Bible facts such as Jesus being baptized in Tiberius’ 15th year (Luke 3:1) and that he was about 30 years old at the time (Luke 3:23). Also considering available historical and scientific data, he estimated that Jesus was born in 753 AUC. He then designated the following year (754 AUC) as 1 AD. There was no year zero, so the period from January of 2 BC to January of 2 AD is only three years instead of four. The absence of a year zero is also why the 21st century actually began on January 1, 2001 instead of in 2000 as many people supposed. It is unclear whether Dionysius included the negative “BC” years in his system or if they were added by Bede in the eight century.”
— Royce (2014), “Origin of the BC/AD Dating System” (Ѻ)

End matter

See also

References

  1. Era of the Martyrs – Wikipedia.
  2. Ab Urbe Condita – Wikipedia.

External links

Theta Delta ics T2.jpg