David Hume

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In existographies, David Hume (244-179 BE) (1711-1776 ACM) (IQ:180|#112) (ID:2.77|#65) (RGM:112|1,350+) (PR:315|65AE / philosopher:31) (Murray 4000:4|WP) (Gottlieb 1000:185) (SN:49) (Becker 139:7|17L) (Stokes 100:39) (GMG:7) (GPhE:#) (GEcE:#) (EPD:F2) (CR:94) (LH:9) (TL:104) was a Scottish philosopher, aka “Newton of moral sciences” (Foley, 1990), noted for []

Overview

In 1729, Hume, aged 18, suffered from physical symptoms, laying ill for weeks, and sought medical help for his condition, only to be told that he suffered from the "disease of the learned".[1]

Quotes

Quotes | On

The following are quotes on Hume:

“The reading of your valuable works has not only inspired me with the strongest admiration for your genius and amiable parts, but gave me the highest idea of your person, and the strongest desire of getting acquainted with one of the greatest philosophers of any age.”
Baron Holbach (1763), “Letter to David Hume”, Aug 22[2]

Quotes | By

The following are quotes by Hume:

“I developed an insurmountable aversion to everything but the pursuits of philosophy and general learning.”
— David Hume (c.1727), My Own Life (pg. #)[3]
“A wise man proportions his belief to the evidence.”
— David Hume (1748), "Of Miracles" [4]
“If we take in our hands any volume of divinity or school of metaphysics, for instance; let us ask, does it contain any abstract reasoning concerning ‘quantity’ or ‘number’? No. Does it contain any ‘experimental’ reasoning concerning matter of fact and existence? No. Commit it to the flames: for it can contain nothing but sophistry and illusion.”
— David Hume (1748), Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (pg. #); cited by Philipp Blom (2010) in A Wicked Company (pg. 142)

End matter

References

  1. (a) Buchan, James. (2007). Capital of the Mind: How Edinburgh Changed the World (pg. 78). Publisher.
    (b) Blom, Philipp. (2010). A Wicked Company: Holbach’s Salon and the Forgotten Radicalism of the European Enlightenment (Amz) (§8: Le Bon David, pgs. 133-50; pg. 139). McClelland, 2011.
  2. Blom, Philipp. (2010). A Wicked Company: Holbach’s Salon and the Forgotten Radicalism of the European Enlightenment (Amz) (§8: Le Bon David, pgs. 133-50; genius, pg. 133). McClelland, 2011.
  3. (a) Norton, David. (1993). The Cambridge Companion to Hume (pg. 351). Cambridge.
    (b) Blom, Philipp. (2010). A Wicked Company: Holbach’s Salon and the Forgotten Radicalism of the European Enlightenment (Amz) (§8: Le Bon David, pgs. 133-50; pg. 139). McClelland, 2011.
  4. Joshi, Sunand T. (2014). The Original Atheists: First Thoughts on Nonbelief (pg. 165). Prometheus Books.

External links

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