College degrees ranked by intellectual difficulty

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The top May 2021 Google search return for "college degrees ranked by difficulty", showing "chemical engineering" as #2, in respect to "time" spent preparing for class "work", wherein we glean the crude formula that difficulty of a subject is proportional to the time and work spent on in.[1]

In education, college degrees ranked by intellectual difficulty (DD:#) refers to

Overview

In c.1991, Libb Thims, age 19, having never studied before, enrolled in a community college, and began to engage into a "Faustian quest" for understanding, in order to understand the "why" of everything, with focus on the mechanism behind "why" he was studying in the first place, in respect to the bigger picture of universal mechanism. After doing some investigative research, in the library and via personal interview, he was informed that "chemical engineering" was the hardest college degree, and also that was the highest paying college degree in America. Having never taken a chemistry class prior, Thims completed this degree, finishing in the top 8% of his class of 156 students.

In 2002, Thims conducted a study of physical attractiveness (beauty) vs intellectual ability (brains), in efforts to find quantifiable proof behind Beckhap’s law (see: Beckhap’s law proof), in which, in respect to “intellectual difficulty, he had 14 people, mixture of college students and working class people, rank the perceived “intellectual difficulty” of the 101 degrees obtained by female students of the 1969 and 1970 graduating classes of the University of Illinois, Chicago, on a scale of 1 “easiest” to 100 “hardest”, the results of which are shown below:[2]

# Degree Difficulty
1. Bio engineering 88.3
2. Electrical engineering wave propagation and radiation 87.5
3. Science and engineering 85.8
4. Mathematics 83.3
5. Chemistry 82.5
6. Energy engineering 81.7
7. Thermal science 81.7
8. Wave propagation and radiation 80
9. Aerospace science 79.2
10. Physics 79.2
11. Aerospace engineering 78.3
12. Computer science and communication 78.3
13. Engineering: Mechanical analysis 78.3
14. Information engineering 77.5
15. Mechanical analysis and design engineering 77.5
16. Metallurgical engineering 76.7
17. Systems analysis engineering 76.7
18. Engineering systems analysis 75.8
19. Engineering structural analysis 75.8
20. Structural design engineering 75.8
21. Applied physics engineering 75
22. Finance 75
23. Applied mechanics engineering 74.2
24. Systems analysis 74.1
25. Biology 73.3
26. Computer science and communication engineering 73.3
27. Architectural structures 72.5
28. Electrical engineering 72.5
29. Operations research engineering 72.5
30. Physics: Education 72.5
31. Structural mechanics 72.5
32. Chemistry and geography 71.7
33. Mechanical engineering 71.7
34. Structural design 70.8
35. Psychology 70.8
36. Spanish and political science 70.8
37. Accounting 70
38. Computer science 70
39. Electronics engineering 70
40. Mechanical analysis and design 69.2
41. Systems engineering 69.2
42. Civil engineering 68.3
43. Manufacturing engineering 67.5
44. Behavioral science 65.8
45. Quantitative methods 65.8
46. Engineering: Structural mechanics 65
47. English literature 64.2
48. Business marketing 63.3
49. Education: mathematics 63.3
50. Wave radio and property 63.3
51. Architecture and art 62.5
52. Systems management 62.5
53. Business administration: Accounting 61.7
54. Business administration: Finance 61.7
55. Secondary education: History 61.7
56. Architectural design 60.8
57. Philosophy 60.8
58. Criminal justice 60
59. Painting graphics art 60
60. Political science 60
61. Architecture 59.2
62. Education: English 58.5
63. English: American literature 58.3
64. Materials engineering 58.3
65. Art history 57.5
66. Biological sciences 57.5
67. Education: History 57.5
68. Metallurgy 57.5
69. Administration of criminal justice 56.7
70. Communications engineering 56.7
71. American literature 55.8
72. Mass communications 55.8
73. Operations research 55.8
74. Sociology: Teacher education 55
75. Industrial design 54.5
76. Elementary education 51.7
77. Mass media 51.7
78. Geology 50
79. History: Teacher education 50
80. Soil mechanics 50
81. Marketing 49.2
82. Spanish literature 49.2
83. Social studies 48.3
84. Design 48.2
85. Economics 47.5
86. English 47.5
87. Business administration: marketing 46.7
88. German 46.6
89. Business administration: operations and systems 45.8
90. Business management 45
91. Geography 45
92. Spanish 44.2
93. Business administration 43.3
94. History 41.7
95. Sociology 40
96. Music 39.2
97. Management 35
98. Speech (radio and television directing) 34.2
99. Speech and theater 33.3
100. Speech: television and radio 32.5
101. Physical education 27.5

Physical attractiveness

Description: A plot of the ranked data results, of the group "female science majors", from the 2002 study of 2,018 University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) college graduation photos, graduating classes of 1969 and 1972, showing that attractiveness is inversely proportion, on average, to intelligence, a finding which corroborates Beckhap's law. Key: P = psychology, B = biology, C = chemistry, and M = mathematics, each with 41, 20, 13, and 21 students, respectively. Similarly, A = physical attractiveness (of group); on a scale of 7.0 = most physically attractive to 1.0 = least physically attractive; and I = intellectual difficulty (of degree); on a scale of 100 = most intellectually difficult to 10 = least intellectually difficult.

Thims, in a separate part of the study, had two people, a married couple in their late 20s, who each scored in the 8.5-9.0 range (on the 10-point hot-or-not.com photo ranking website; when it was active), sort through and rank-by-attractiveness (physical attractiveness), some 2,000+ photos of the UIC graduating classes of 1969, 1970, 1972, 1973, and 1980, the male ranking the females, the female ranking the males, without knowing what degree each person obtained. He then graphically plotted the two data sets, therein finding that "physical attractiveness" varies inversely with "mental attractiveness", therein proving Beckhap's law, date which he then correlated to enthalpic (physical heat) and entropy (mental heat) reaction parameters.[3]

Quotes

The following are related quotes:

“It doesn’t take a brain surgeon to sell Morton Salt. But being a chemical engineer doesn’t hurt.”
— Anon (c.1998), “Recruiting advertert” [4]

End matter

References

  1. Hardest College Majors – PrepScholar.com.
  2. (a) Thims, Libb. (2002). “UIC: Attractiveness vs. Intelligence Data: 2,000 graduation photos rated for attractiveness and undergraduate degrees per each photo rated for intellectual difficulty” (Ѻ), IoHT Research Project.
    (b) Thims, Libb. (2003). Human Thermodynamics, Volumes 1-3 (Research project #, pg. 221). IoHT Publications.
    (c) Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume Two) (UIC: Attractiveness vs. Intelligence Study, pgs. 671-72). LuLu.
  3. Beckhap’s law proof (subdomain) – Hmolpedia 2020.
  4. Location: clipping in Libb Thims green envelope, in his “Odd Stuff” folder

External links

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