Catherine Cox

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In existographies, Catherine Cox (65 BE-29 AE) (1890-1984 ACM) (CR:106) (LH:4) (TL:110|#93) was an American psychologist, noted, in genius studies, for her 1926 PhD turned book Early Mental Traits of 300 Geniuses, wherein, with the collaboration of Maud Merrill and Lewis Terman, her PhD advisor, she assigned IQs to the top 300 geniuses of the Cattell 1000, of adulthood age between 1350 and 1850.[1]

Sways

Influences

Cox was influenced by Lewis Terman, Francis Galton, and James Cattell.

Influenced

Cox influenced Dean Simonton.

Overview

Catherine Cox reading and testing, supposedly, the intelligence level, or IQ, of a child.

Genius studies

In 1923, Cox defined IQ as follows:

IQ is thought to be a measure which expresses the relative brightness or intelligence of any given individual.”
— Catherine Cox (1926), Early Mental Traits of Three Hundred Geniuses (pg. 47)[1]

Here, to note, in the original version the word "constant" is shown before the word measure; this has been removed, per reason that "IQ", if it is a numerical value expression of "relative brightness" to all humans who have ever existed, then it has been shown NOT to be a constant measure, i.e. "brightness" can be increased in geniuses, the same way current through a light bulb can turn up or down the brightness of the bulb; the way fire can become brighter by adding more fuel to it; the way the brightness of stars vary, etc.; moreover historical brightness of retrospectively gauged IQs (see: retrospect IQ), has generally been found to be a function of the "work" put into the subject matter, which in some cases produced a fuel, flame, or brightness, that lights humanity for millennia.

Education

In 1911, Cox completed her BA, in 1913, her MA, in German language and literature, and in 1924 or 1925 completed her PhD in psychology with a dissertation on “On the Early Mental Development of a Group of Eminent Men”[2], under Lewis Terman, all at Stanford University.[3]

End matter

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 (a) Cox, Catharine. (1926). Genetic Studies of Genius. Volume II. The Early Mental Traits of Three Hundred Geniuses (GB) (Arc) (pdf) (ratings, pg. viii). Stanford University Press.
    (b) Cox IQ (subdomain) – Hmolpedia 2020.
    (c) Cox IQs – IQComparisonSite.com.
  2. Cox, Catherine. (1924). “On the Early Mental Development of a Group of Eminent Men” (WC); preliminary report of findings; fuller version in 1926 book , dissertation/thesis. Stanford University.
  3. Catherine Cox – IntellTheory.com.

Works

  • Cox, Catharine. (1926). Genetic Studies of Genius. Volume II. The Early Mental Traits of Three Hundred Geniuses (GB) (Arc) (pdf) (ratings, pg. viii). Stanford University Press.

External links

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