Animate chemistry

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In terms, animate chemistry (LH:#), from animate, from Greek anima, meaning: "wind, mind, soul, or spirit", depending on translation (or perspective)[1], + Egyptian chemistry, meaning: "study of the elements of the earth", as compared to “inanimate chemistry”, refers to []

Quotes

The following are quotes:

“A living system is an autonomous self-sustained chemical system capable of undergoing a Darwinian type of evolution and therefore characterized primarily by its dynamic properties such as metabolism, self-reproduction, and mutability (Miller, 1974;[2] Eschenmoser and Kisakiira, 1996; Kauffman, 1993; Oparin, 1965; Eigen, 1984)[3]. The above criteria, although necessary in defining the phenomenon of life, are clearly not sufficient to establish how ‘inanimate chemistry’ is transformed into a living system. Based on our present level of comprehension, ‘animate chemistry’ cannot be defined precisely. In fact, the striving for the complete understanding of living systems, as well as the related challenge of creating an artificial chemical life, fuels our interest and numerous other experimental groups engaged in chemical, biological, and physical sciences. However, despite this incomplete understanding, one can still wonder whether the transition from ‘inanimate’ to ‘animate’ chemistry is marked by distinguishing features that may lend themselves to experimental modeling..”
— Reza Ghadiri (1998), “Self-Organized Autocatalytic Chemical Networks and Molecular Ecosystems: Do They Provide the Experimental Tools for Modeling the Transition from Inanimate to Animate Chemistry?” (pg. #) [4]

End matter

See also

References

  1. Note: Theo Jansen's wooden strandbeests, are wind-powered walking animations; animals are also “breathing things”, which is the base root of the term anima, as in things that take wind in and out, via respiration; there are also molecular animate things. In other contexts, e.g. Aristotle's De Anima, the term "soul" or "mind" tends to be the common English rendering.
  2. Miller, Stanley L.; Orgel, Leslie E. (1974). The Origins of Life on Earth. Prentice Hall.
  3. Eigen, Manfred. (1984). “The Origin and Evolution of Life at the Molecular Level” (abs), Advances in Chemical Physics, 55:119-37.
  4. Ghadiri, M. Reza. (1998). “Self-Organized Autocatalytic Chemical Networks and Molecular Ecosystems: Do They Provide the Experimental Tools for Modeling the Transition from Inanimate to Animate Chemistry?”, in: Recent Trends in Molecular Recognition (editors: F. Diederich, H. Künzer) (abs) (pgs. 2-3-38, quote, pg. #). Springer.
  5. Animate thermodynamics – Hmolpedia 2020.
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