Absolute temperature

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In thermodynamics, absolute temperature (TR:63) (LH:8) (TL:71) is temperature defined on the Kelvin scale (Thomson, 1848), on which “absolute zero”, the lowest temperature possible, corresponds to 0 degrees kelvin (K).

Overview

In 1848, William Thomson, in his “On an Absolute Thermometric Scale Founded on Carnot’s Theory of the Motive Power of Heat”, derived the absolute temperature scale, aka “Kelvin scale”, or “absolute thermometric scale”, as he called it based on the Sadi Carnot’s 1824 On the Motive Power of Fire.[1]

End matter

References

  1. Thomson, William. (1848). “On an Absolute Thermometric Scale Founded on Carnot’s Theory of the Motive Power of Heat” (pgs. 100-06), Cambridge Philosophical Society Proceedings, Jun 5; in: Philosophical Magazine, Oct 1848.

External links

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